Holiday Traditions – July

Canada Day: July 1

Prior to 1982, Canada Day, which celebrates the events of July 1, 1867, was known as Dominion Day, First of July, Confederation Day, and July the First.On July 1, 1867, the British North America Act brought about the first Canadian federal government by proclaiming “one Dominion under the name of Canada.” Canada East (Quebec), Canada West (Ontario), Nova Scotia and New Brunswick were united under a parliamentary system based on the British legislature.

Today more than 27 million Canadians celebrate Canada Day at picnics, backyard barbecues, cottages or in urban centers with family and friends. Major celebrations include parades and concerts and a gathering on Parliament Hill in Ottawa. Traditionally, the night’s celebration turns spectacular with a grand finale of fireworks.

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I Forgot Day: July 2

In these hurried times it’s easy to forget special dates.
On I Forgot Day, people send flowers and gifts to make up for occasions they forgot to acknowledge. It’s the perfect opportunity to send belated birthday or anniversary greetings; to say, “Sorry I forgot your special day”.

Independence Day: July 4

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The United States’ Declaration of Independence, drafted between June 11 and June 28, 1776, represents not only the spirit of America, but is seen as a monument to Independence worldwide. Individual liberty had already been expressed by John Locke and the Continental philosophers, and the wording of the document can be seen as a list of grievances against the King of England.

Today, Americans celebrate their Independence with verve. Family gatherings, town fairs, and most of all fireworks enforce the principles set out in the Declaration of Independence: community, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

Cousins Day: July 24

Cousins Day pays special tribute to cousins who are living and memorializes those who have died.

On Cousins Day, cousins who live close by enjoy a hobby or common interest that they share or a special brunch or dinner. Cousins who live far away send special letters, cards, or flowers and gifts to say “I love, cherish, and appreciate you.”