Holiday Traditions – June

National Rose Month: June 1-30
Flag Day: June 14
Father’s Day: June 15
St. John the Baptist Day (Canada): June 24

National Rose Month: June 1-30

rose_redAmerica’s association with the rose dates back to the voyage of Christopher Columbus. It is said that while adrift in the Sargasso Sea, one of Columbus’ crewmen found a rose branch floating in the water. This sign of land rekindled Columbus’ spirit and gave him the courage to continue his journey to the New World.

US citizens recognize the beauty of the rose, the US national floral emblem, throughout the month of June. National Rose Month is celebrated by sending rose bouquets to friends and loved ones, by planting rose gardens, or by decorating with roses in the home.

Some US towns and cities host expositions and festivals dedicated to the rose. At the Long Island Rose Show, more than 1,000 roses are showcased by amateur growers in competition for awards. Beautiful and classic, with a language all its own, the rose is welcomed around the world as a symbol of love, friendship, success, and peace.

Flag Day: June 14

The Fourth of July was traditionally celebrated as America’s birthday, but the idea of an annual day specifically celebrating the American flag originated in 1885.

On June 14, 1889, George Balch, a kindergarten teacher in New York City, planned appropriate ceremonies for the children of his school. His idea of observing Flag Day was later adopted by the State Board of Education of New York.

Following the suggestion of Colonel Leach, historian of the Pennsylvania Society of the Sons of the Revolution, the Pennsylvania Society of Colonial Dames of America adopted a resolution on April 25, 1893 requesting the mayor of Philadelphia and all others in authority and all private citizens to display the American flag on June 14.

Leach went on to recommend that thereafter the day be known as “Flag Day,” and on that day, school children be assembled for appropriate exercises, with each child being given a small Flag.

Inspired by these three decades of state and local celebrations, Flag Day — the anniversary of the Flag Resolution of 1777 — was officially established by the Proclamation of President Woodrow Wilson on May 30, 1916.

While Flag Day was celebrated in various communities for years after Wilson’s proclamation, it was not until August 3, 1949, that President Truman signed an Act of Congress designating June 14 of each year as National Flag Day.

Source:
usflag.org

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Father’s Day: June 15

Father’s Day is a day for honoring fathers and other men who act as father figures. Fathers, stepfathers, uncles, grandfathers, and adult male friends receive cards, flowers and gifts on Father’s Day. Dads, husbands and grandfathers traditionally relax and enjoy the company of their children.

It wasn’t until Mrs. Dodd became an adult that she realized the strength and selflessness her father had shown in raising his children as a single parent. The original date chosen for the holiday was June 5, Mr. Smart’s birthday, however the celebration was postponed until June 19, the third Sunday in June, because there was not enough time to prepare. Meanwhile, in various towns and cities across America, other people were beginning to celebrate a day just for fathers.

In early times, wearing flowers was a traditional way of celebrating Father’s Day. Mrs. Dodd favored the red rose to honor a father still living, while a white flower honored a deceased dad. J.H. Berringer, who also held Father’s Day celebrations in Washington State as early as 1912, chose a white lilac as the Father’s Day Flower.

In 1924, President Coolidge supported the idea of a national Father’s Day, but it never became official until 1966 when President Johnson signed the proclamation that set aside the third Sunday of June as Father’s Day. It’s a tradition that has carried on to the present day in both the US and Canada.

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St. John the Baptist Day (Canada): June 24

June 24 marks the Feast of St. John the Baptist. To French speaking cultures, this occasion is known as St. Jean Baptiste Day.

Originally, June 24 was the pagan celebration of the summer solstice. King Clovis of France christianized the event by making it a religious celebration of the birth of John the Baptist. John the Baptist is known as the precursor of Christ, rebirth, and the light to the world. To symbolize the light of the world, bonfires aplenty were lit.

For the Catholics of Europe — especially those in France — this festival was of particular importance. As the French culture moved to America, the celebration came along for the ride!

In Quebec, where there’s a large French speaking population, St. Jean Baptiste Day took hold and has been going strong for many decades.

Source:
about.com

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