September

Labor Day: September 1
Grandparents’ Day: September 7

Labor Day: September 1

A national legal holiday that is more than a century old, Labor Day observes the commitment and sacrifices made by workers and laborers. For most people it’s a day for rest and recreation. Since Labor Day marks the end of summer, campsites, beaches, and resorts are crowded with people enjoying the summer’s final three-day weekend.

Labor Day originated from a celebration in honor of the working class held by the Knights of Labor in 1882. On September 5, 1884, the first Labor Day parade was held in New York City, where 20,000 workers carried banners which read “eight hours for work, eight hours for rest, eight hours for recreation.”

Throughout the next few years, the idea spread from the East to the West, and eventually the entire U.S. participated. Colorado was the first state to declare Labor Day a state holiday in 1887; seven years later, in 1894, President Cleveland declared Labor Day a federal public holiday.

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Grandparents’ Day: September 7

On Grandparents’ Day, grandchildren show their appreciation for their grandparents by spending quality time with them and by sending cards, flowers, and gifts.

Grandparents’ Day has three purposes: to honor grandparents; to give grandparents the opportunity to show their love for their grandchildren; and to help children realize the insight and guidance older people can offer. Every grandchild may be involved in the celebrations, as it’s a day for discovering family roots and for learning patience and understanding.

Originally observed by the state of West Virginia, Grandparents’ Day was declared a national holiday by U.S. congress in 1978. To signify the “autumn years” of life, September was chosen for the holiday. Today millions throughout the United States observe this event.

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